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Hyperlaxity Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

What is it?

Hyperlaxity is excessive joint movement.

The strength and strength of the body’s internal tissues are managed by certain connective tissue proteins. In the case of a modification within these proteins, abnormalities relating to the moving parts of the body (joints, tendons, cartilages and ligaments) are then more impacted, becoming more vulnerable and more fragile and can cause lesions. It is therefore a joint hyperlaxity.

This hyperlaxity causes hyper-extension easily and painlessly some members of the body. This flexibility of the limbs is the direct consequence of a vulnerability or absence of ligaments and sometimes bone fragility.

This pathology concerns more the shoulders, the elbows, the wrists, the knees and the fingers. Hyperlaxity usually occurs in childhood, during the development of connective tissue.

Other names to associate with the disease are:
– hypermobility;
– the disease of loose ligaments;
– hyperlaxity syndrome.

Subjects with hyperlaxity are more sensitive and have a higher risk of fractures and ligament dislocations during a sprain, strain, etc.

Means make it possible to limit the risk of complications in the context of this pathology, in particular:
muscle strengthening and ligament reinforcement exercises;
– a learning of the “normal range” of movements to avoid hyper-extensions:
– the protection of ligaments during physical activity, using padding systems, and knee pads, etc.

The treatment of the disease is relief of pain and ligament strengthening. In this context, a prescription of drugs (creams, sprays, etc.) is often associated and accompanied by therapeutic physical exercises.

Symptoms of Hyperlaxity

Hyperlaxity is excessive joint movement.

The strength and strength of the body’s internal tissues are managed by certain connective tissue proteins. In the case of a modification within these proteins, abnormalities relating to the moving parts of the body (joints, tendons, cartilages and ligaments) are then more impacted, becoming more vulnerable and more fragile and can cause lesions. It is therefore a joint hyperlaxity.

This hyperlaxity causes hyper-extension easily and painlessly some members of the body. This flexibility of the limbs is the direct consequence of a vulnerability or absence of ligaments and sometimes bone fragility.

This pathology concerns more the shoulders, the elbows, the wrists, the knees and the fingers. Hyperlaxity usually occurs in childhood, during the development of connective tissue.

Other names to associate with the disease are:
– hypermobility;
– the disease of loose ligaments;
– hyperlaxity syndrome.

Subjects with hyperlaxity are more sensitive and have a higher risk of fractures and ligament dislocations during a sprain, strain, etc.

Means make it possible to limit the risk of complications in the context of this pathology, in particular:
muscle strengthening and ligament reinforcement exercises;
– a learning of the “normal range” of movements to avoid hyper-extensions:
– the protection of ligaments during physical activity, using padding systems, and knee pads, etc.

The treatment of the disease is relief of pain and ligament strengthening. In this context, a prescription of drugs (creams, sprays, etc.) is often associated and accompanied by therapeutic physical exercises.

The origins of the disease

Most cases of hyperlaxity are unrelated to any underlying cause. In this case, it is benign hyperlaxity.
Moreover, this pathology can also be linked to:
– abnormalities in the bone structure, the shape of the bones;
– abnormalities in tone and muscle rigidity;
– the presence of hyperlaxity in the family.

Hyperlaxity

This last case puts forward the possibility of heredity in the transmission of the disease.

In rare cases, hyperlaxity results from underlying medical conditions. These include:
– Down syndrome, characterized by intellectual disability;
– Cleidocranial dysplasia, characterized by a hereditary disorder in bone development;
– Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, characterized by significant elasticity of the connective tissue;
– Marfan syndrome, which is also a connective tissue disease;
– Morquio syndrome, a hereditary disease that affects the metabolism.

Risk factors for Hyperlaxity

The risk factors for developing this disease are not known in their entirety.

Some underlying conditions may be additional risk factors in the development of the disease, such as; down syndrome, Cleidocranial dysplasia, etc. However, these conditions only concern a minority of patients.

In addition, a suspicion of transmission of the disease to the descendant was put forward by the scientists. In this sense, the presence of genetic mutations for certain genes, in the parents, can make it an additional risk factor for developing the disease.

Prevention and treatment for Hyperlaxity

The diagnosis of the disease is differential, given the different characteristics associated.
The Beighton test then makes it possible to evaluate the impact of the disease on the muscular movements. This test consists of a series of 5 exams. These are relative to:
– the position of the palm of the hand on the ground while keeping the legs stretched;
– bend each elbow backwards;
– bend each knee backwards;
– bend the thumb towards the forearm;
– bend the little finger backwards by more than 90 °.
As part of a Beighton score greater than or equal to 4, the subject is potentially hyperlax.

A blood test and radiology may also be necessary in the diagnosis of the disease. These methods make it possible to highlight the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

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